Parkinson’s Disease: Nutritional factors

By Marie Regis

PARKINSON’S DEFINITION According to conventional medicine, “Parkinson’s disease is an idiopathic, slowly progressive, degenerative disorder of the Central Nervous System characterized by four main features:

  1. Slowness and poverty of movement
  2. Muscular rigidity
  3. Resting tremor
  4. Postural instability..”

(Taken from the book “The Treatment of Modern Western Medical diseases with Chinese medicine”, by Bob Flaws and Phillippe Sionneau)

Parkinson’s includes severe depletion of Dopamine.

According to Chinese medicine, this disease can be caused by constitutional weakness, aging, longstanding illness, physical taxation, chronic emotional problems and poor diet. Emotional trauma can lead to a decline in Dopamine levels. Dopamine is a pleasure hormone; therefore doing things that bring us joy may bring back Dopamine.  Dopamine makes us feel nourished, and that life is worthwhile. It also reduces pain.D

  • DETRIMENTAL FOODS and EATING HABITS
  • Eating sugar depleats Dopamine and Serotonin levels. It also weakens the digestive system, which is where 80% of the Serotonin is produced. Serotonin is a mood regulating hormone.
  • Skipping meals and eating a lot of cold or raw foods will weaken digestion, which makes the stomach unable to digest protein in particular
  • A vegetarian diet is problematic for many people in that it often leads to amino acid / protein deficiencies. This will lead to an insufficiency in neurotransmitters that are important to brain health
  • Caffein intake in combination with a stressful lifestyle can add to the physical taxation mentioned above.
    • Alcohol and drugs leach out Mg, leading to increased acidity / oxidative stress in the body
  • HELPFUL FOODS
  • Dopamine is found in flesh, meat. 
  • Dark leafy greens are alkalizing and high in many minerals and B vitamins
  • Legumes are very important: velvet beans esp., Fava beans. These beans have high amounts of Tyrosine to build back Dopamine
  • Mushrooms are high in nutritional value. They are a great source of fiber and protein, as well as B vitamins, copper, potassium, selenium and vitamin D
  • Quinoa has all essential amino acids. The Chinese use Buckwheat (not as high as Quinoa) to build Dopamine
  • Our Dopamine can become deficient because the stomach isn’t able to digest it. The easiest thing to digest meat are enzymes found in fruit: Pineapple (bromaline), apricots, figs, jujube have enzmes. We stew meat with figs in meditarreanian cooking. Cook the meat with the fruit, so body can easily get the raw material. Helps with depression- trouble managing  pain, the pleasure principle. 
  • GABA: Epinephrine and Norepinephrine relate to the flight or flight response. Fear shuts down the pleasure principle and reduces pleasure hormones. GABA is antagonist to the fear hormones. Foods high in GABA include: seeds (sunflower seeds) and shellfish, shrimp, halibut, grouper. 
  • Antioxydants can help reduce  the fight and flight response
  • Adequate concentration of Mg is very important for Ph balance. Low Mg can lower dopamine. Diet can affect alkaline-acid balance (7.2-7.3 is balanced). Increasing acidity means increasing Sympathetic Nervous System activity (flight or flight). Increasing alkalinity leads to increased Parasympathetic Nervous System activity (Digestion, healing, immunity). *Note that testing is not accurate in blood tests because Mg stays in cell. A swab from the tongue could measure it..

This is by no means a comprehensive list of foods that are either beneficial or harmful to people with Parkinsons. Please consult with your physician regarding any possible interaction between supplements and medicine prescribed to you.

Acupuncture for Peace of Mind

The Mind and Body are ONE. Many people report feeling more peaceful after Acupuncture, even if they have come for strictly physical issues. Chinese medicine believes when we improve the body’s function, the mind will follow. Marie has found that people in psychotherapy make faster progress WITH acupuncture treatments. She has had success with people suffering from:

  • PTSD, anxiety and panic attacks
  • Difficulty concentrating, ADHD
  • Low self-esteem or confidence 
  • Irritability and depression
  • Obsessive-compulsive  and addictive disorders
  • Eating disorders: binging, anorexia, bulimia.
  • Difficulty with loss and grieving
  • Bonding and intimacy issues

Consistent treatment over time can help re-program the brain and nervous system to function more harmoniously, helping to cultivate virtues that support life: 

  • Faith in ourselves and in our social environment
  • The ability to let go
  • Feeling grounded and centered
  • Calmness, presence and resilience
  • Improved memory and cognition

PEACE , Marie

Recovering from Parkinson’s

By Marie Regis, L.Ac.

As with any chronic degenerative disease, a diagnosis of Parkinson’s is a life-changing event. Shock, disbelief, fear or anger can set in- understandably!. The medical prognosis is not good, and treatments available with conventional medicine are palliative and do not provide a cure.

As a practitioner of Classical Chinese medicine, I believe there is no incurable disease, only incurable people. There are people who have recovered from stage four cancer, for reasons that are not yet explained by modern science and lived for years without recurrence. (Read “Radical Remission, the Nine Key Factors That Can Make a Real Difference, by Kelly A. Turner, PhD. ) Yet culturally we have come to expect these healings are impossible.

People who have recovered from Parkinson’s have committed to a comprehensive lifestyle change, which may include: dietary changes, meditation, Qi gong, Acupuncture and Chinese medicine, and a commitment to changing detrimental and stressful beliefs and attitudes. Chinese medicine tells us that all chronic disease starts with a chronic emotional/spiritual imbalance. This leads to inflammation, weakness in certain organ systems, leading to loss of function in the neurological and hormonal systems.

Howard Shifke’s book “Fighting Parkinson’s and Winning” is based on his own recovery from Parkinson’s. It is a must read from anyone who has had this diagnosis or anyone with a family history of this disease.

Introduction to Meditation SPRING Series

DATES: March 5th, 12th and 19th 2019 from 1:30 – 3:00 P.M.

WHERE: Roslyn High School, 475 Round Hill Rd., Roslyn Heights NY 11577

CONTACT: Roslyn High School Continuing Education at roslynschools.org or call 516-801-5091 for more information and to register.

MEDITATION BASICS: Learn EASY meditation and mindfulness techniques from a variety of traditions, so you can finally LET GO.. and enjoy life fully

Community Healing event for people who still carry trauma from 9/11

I am planning a Community Healing event for people who still carry trauma from 9/11 and others who suffer from high levels of stress. I am offering it as a Free Public Service to encourage people to explore ways to reduce stress so they and their families can live a better quality of life.

Date :  Sunday September 11th, 12 Noon to 3 PM.

Where:  At the Great Neck Arts Center, 113 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck NY 11021    (Parking  available behind the building)

For Directions: www.greatneckarts.org or call 516-829-2570

About this event:  This event offers free acupuncture to reduce stress. The treatment follows the NADA (National Acupuncture Detoxification Association) protocol, which is highly effective in resetting a person’s nervous system and giving them a new starting place from which they can heal. This event will raise funds to support Acupuncturists Without Borders’ (AWB) national and international effort to help people who have suffered from Post Traumatic Stress  (PTSD) following natural or man-made disasters. AWB’s vision is to foster the creation of stable, peaceful global communities through its community-based acupuncture services and training, which interrupt the cycles of unresolved trauma (visit www.acuwithoutborders.org for more info).

 About the Acupuncture Treatment:

  •  A 30 to 45 minute treatment in a community-style group setting with no disrobing
  • Five tiny pre-packaged and sterile needles on each ear, nearly painless when the needles go in.
  • A relaxing experience that reduces stress and anxiety, aids with sleep and provides an overall sense of well-being.

In addition:

  • Chair massage and Reiki treatments will also be offered FREE of charge.
  • Free refreshments will be provided.
  • No appointment is necessary – Suggested donation: $15.

Please note: Marie will be opening a low cost Stress Clinic in her office using Community Style Acupuncture on Friday evenings from 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM, starting September 17th 2011.

For more information on the power of ear acupuncture as a treatment for PTSD, please follow the link below, illustrating how it was used by Acupuncturists without Borders  after the earthquake in Haiti:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bonttXGcJw&feature=email

 

 

 

THE ANATOMY OF HEALING: AN ACUPUNCTURIST’S PERSPECTIVE

“The real voyage of discovery lies not in seeking new lands but in seeing with new eyes”
Marcel Proust

THE ANATOMY OF HEALING: AN ACUPUNCTURIST’S PERSPECTIVE

A Lecture by Marie Regis, L.Ac.

Date/Time: Sunday May 29th from 4:00 to 5:00 PM
Location: The Acupuncture & Wellness Center, 29 Barstow Rd, Suite 304, Great Neck NY 11021

What is illness and what does it take to come back to a state of wholeness? Why is it that some health conscious people become ill while others seem to get away with poor diets and remain relatively healthy? Why do we sometimes feel worse when we give up the junk food and adopt a healthier lifestyle?
Being diagnosed with a chronic illness can throw us into a state of fear, shock or disbelief and our expectations often become an obstacle to healing. A new way of perceiving the changes in our body may be an important step in our healing journey. Marie Regis will share from her clinical experience and from the Chinese medicine perspective on the physiology of healing. There will be ample time for questions and answers.Marie Regis is a Licensed Acupuncturist with a practice in Great Neck. She has 20 years’ experience as a Massage Therapist, CranioSacral therapist and Reiki practitioner. She has studied extensively with Jeffrey Yuen, a Taoist priest and internationally recognized teacher and scholar in Classical Chinese Medicine.

Please call Marie at 516.455.2206 to confirm you’re coming as seating is limited.